Current Events

We are delighted to feature another post by Manfred Schuck, a terrific payments consultant from Frankfurt, who will co-lead with Elizabeth McQuerry our upcoming Payments in Europe Insight workshop to be held in Mountain View, CA on October 9. Now, it’s about cards.  Here’s how the European Payments Council (EPC), the self-regulation body of the […]

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This week, we are delighted to feature a post by Manfred Schuck, a payments consultant from Frankfurt.  Manfred will co-lead with Elizabeth McQuerry our upcoming Payments in Europe Insight workshop to be held in Mountain View, CA on October 9.  On January 1st, 2001 fifteen European countries introduced notes and coins of a new common […]

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One of the pleasures of joining Glenbrook has been getting to know what and how the other Glebrookers think about what’s happening in the payments industry.  We talk a lot at Glenbrook. Over iChat, email, mobile phones, Skype, Google Hangout with voice and video, through Google Docs, and whenever we meet up for client work […]

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Glenbrook’s Bryan Derman is in Las Vegas for the 2010 Prepaid Expo. Clearly, you know that an industry has “arrived” when it is able to attract (and afford!) a former U.S. President to speak at its annual convention. Well, any lingering doubts about the importance and sustainability of the prepaid card industry were probably addressed […]

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I spent most of 2008 and early 2009 completely obsessed with the credit crisis (evidenced by this index of the best crisis coverage I created just over a year ago). Reading this Andrew Ross Sorkin piece in tomorrow’s New York Times got me all riled up again: What the Financial Crisis Commission Should Ask NYTimes’ […]

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I‘ve been trying to enjoy the little culture skirmish that surfaced last week as media watchdog Jon Stewart of the Comedy Central took comedian Jim Cramer of CNBC to task for failing to warn the public that the valuation of  houses, equities, municipal bonds, commodities, and every other financial asset in the global economy had […]

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Amid increased government ownership of Citibank, persistent rumors that BofA is next, and announcement of the Obama administration’s budget, there has been increasingly loud debate over bank nationalization. The media pundits and blogosphere are a cry with claims of pending socialism and the “Europeanizaton of America” – which, while provocative, aren’t necessarily true.

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Today at The Huffington Post Tim Berry shares the results of a survey conducted last week to explore the availability of business credit via bank loans, commercial credit, SBA loans, etc. The results are not surprising: there’s precious little credit available. We’ve been reading those headlines and statistics for weeks now. But what struck me […]

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In honor of the Oscars this evening, a post on banking and the movies. Last week the film The International opened, featuring Clive Owen and Naomi Watts. The film is about evil, murderous bankers – the bad bank in the movie resembles an International sinister organization out of a James Bond plot. As it turns […]

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This week's Economist includes a Special Report on The Future of Finance (and it's not pretty): Contents: The collapse of finance Why is finance so unstable? Fallible mathematical models When markets turn Playing financial chicken Regulating finance Fixing finance

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The latest post at the Wells Fargo-Wachovia merger blog hints at the complexity involved in integrating the two banks' services, technology, and products. Let alone the people + organizational structure! I admire their honest, open approach.

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(via Freakonomics) The latest recession indicator: more people are searching Google for "coupons" than for "Britney Spears." And it's not that Britney is getting less popular.

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The folks at Bloomberg have alerted me that Paulson will be on Bloomberg TV today: In an exclusive interview as he prepares to leave office, Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson responds to the latest jobs number — which could be the worst since the 1970s. He'll also talk about his biggest successes and biggest disappointments in […]

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The December job loss numbers are not pretty and the markets are down. A good summary at MarketBeat and particularly nice graphics at the NYT (the charts are linked by animation at their site).

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I'm not the only one with a crush on Andrew Ross Sorkin, editor of NYTimes DealBook. He's been so great on Charlie Rose (my other big crush) that the NYC PBS station has invited him to host a seven-part series on the economy and what it means to everyday New Yorkers. Starts on Thursday the […]

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